Classification Guide

If you are new to para sport and want to know more about how classification works then follow this guide.

T11

T11 is for runners with a near-total visual impairment. All compete in blacked-out glasses, with a sighted guide.

T11 is for long jumpers with a near-total visual impairment. All compete in blacked-out glasses. A sighted guide assists with run-up direction and take-off timing.

T12

T12 runners can recognise a moving object at a distance of roughly one metre. They can choose to race with or without a sighted guide.

T12 long jumpers can recognise a moving object at a distance of roughly one metre.  They count strides to hit the take-off board correctly.

T13

T13 is for runners with a minimal visual impairment. They have a restricted field of view with ability to recognise a tennis-ball sized object at a maximum of five metres.

T13 is for long jumpers with a minimal visual impairment, affecting depth perception for the jump take-off

T12/13

T13 is for runners with a visual impairment. They have a restricted field of view, their peripheral vision is limited and central vision can be a blur.

T13 is for high jumpers with a visual impairment. Their peripheral vision is limited, central vision can be a blur, affecting run-up and take-off precision.

T20

T20 is for runners who have an intellectual impairment. They find it hard to absorb information and apply race-plans and tactics.

T20 long jumpers find it hard to absorb information and apply complex training programmes, especially if it involves multiple instructions.

T20 triple jumpers may have difficulty when retaining competition information, which affects their ability to alter technique or tactics.

T34

T34 racers sometimes hit the wheels slightly unevenly and strike the push rim inconsistently. All compensate for this by focussing on their pushing pattern to establish an even rhythm.

T35

T35 runners are affected in all limbs, though mostly in the legs. They achieve speed by utilising a short, fast stride.

T36

T36 runners have all four limbs affected. They show involuntary movements, which impact on the start, stride pattern and balance.

T36 long jumpers have all four limbs affected. They compensate for involuntary movements which impacts the start of the run-up, balance, stride pattern and take-off.

T37

T37 runners have to compensate for asymmetry in the start, stride and overall power distribution.

T37 is for long jumpers with a moderate co-ordination impairment on one side.

T38

T38 runners show asymmetry and slightly reduced co-ordination of muscle movement. Their running style is smoothed out as they increase in speed.

T38 long jumpers compensate for reduced co-ordination across the stride, arm drive and overall muscle control. Their ability to anticipate the take off can be affected. 

T42

T42 runners adjust for asymmetric balance in both the start position and running pattern. They drive from the hips and core to propel themselves.

T42 long jumpers must focus harder to sense where they are in relation to the run-up whilst maintaining good running posture to precisely hit the take-off board. 

T42 high jumpers generate balance and propulsion from one leg only.

T43

T43 runners have difficulty when accelerating out of the blocks but all have knee joints creating good stability.

T44

T44 runners have unaffected thigh muscles providing good stability through the running cycle.

T44 long jumpers all have knee joints producing good foot control for the jump take-off.

T47

T47 runners adjust for asymmetric upper body balance, which especially affects stability in the Set Position at the start.

T47 long jumpers adjust for asymmetric upper body balance, which can influence their choice of take-off leg. 

T47 triple jumpers adjust for asymmetric upper body balance, which affects the power distribution through the running cycle on the run-up and hop, step and jump.

T47 high jumpers adjust for asymmetric upper body balance, which affects power distribution in the running cycle on the run-up and take-off. 

T53

T53 racers have to stop pushing when using the compensator, the device which controls the steering of the front wheel for the bend.

T54

T54 racers can generate power through the full range of body and arm movements, providing good acceleration from the start and highly responsive manoeuvring during the race.

F11

F11 is for javelin throwers with a near-total visual impairment. All compete in blacked-out glasses.

F11 is for discus throwers with a near-total visual impairment. All compete in blacked-out glasses

F12

F12 is for discus throwers with a moderate visual impairment. They have a restricted field of view or centre vision is a blur.

F12 shot putters can recognise a moving object at a distance of roughly one metre.

F13

F13 javelin throwers have a visual impairment. They have a restricted field of view, their peripheral vision is limited and central vision can be a blur.

F20

F20 shot putters are affected when retaining competition information, which impacts upon alterations in technique or tactics.

F34

F34 javelin throwers can generate power through the twisting of the trunk but have difficulty on the throw release.

F34 shot putters’ fine motor control is affected but they use full movement of the trunk to create good power generation.

F35

F35 shot putters have decreased balance so may adjust the way they throw to ensure they remain within the throwing circle.

F36

F36 shot putters have all four limbs affected. They compensate for involuntary movements, which affects their grasp, release and balance

F37

F37 javelin throwers have to adjust for asymmetry, with restricted arm drive and ankle movement affecting the delivery of the throw.

F37 discus throwers have to compensate for asymmetry, they throw with their unaffected arm but compensate for imbalance.

F38

F38 shot putters are affected by slightly reduced co-ordination across the rotation, arm drive and overall muscle control.

F38 javelin throwers compensate for reduced co-ordination across the stride, arm drive and overall muscle control. This affects the timing of the throw.

F42

F42 shot putters have a fixed knee, athlete find it difficult getting out of the throwing cycle to remain in the circle.

F42 discus throwers may adapt throw by not doing the turn, they drive from the hips and core to propel the discus.

F44

F44 shot putters have difficulty focussing on foot placement around the throwing circle, reducing the ability to precisely spin round to release the throw.

F44 javelin throwers adapt the run-up and may have difficulty stopping before the no-throw line.

F44 discus throwers have difficulty focussing on foot placement around the throwing circle, reducing the ability to precisely spin round to release the throw.